Billund

Centrally located on the mainland of Denmark, Billund is perhaps most famous as the birthplace of LEGO...

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... and the home of the original LEGOLAND park theme park. But there's more to the city than plastic bricks and pirate ships. Take a road trip out of town to discover the bleak beauty of the Jutland peninsula, with its powdery sand beaches, vibrant port towns and ancient heathlands, and return home telling tales of Viking rune-stones, ancient kings and fascinating wartime history.

Arriving at Billund Airport

Billund International Airport is the second largest in Denmark and serves a wide range of domestic and international routes. With only one terminal, the airport is relatively easy to navigate, and the public transport connections are good too. Buses run from outside the terminal to train stations in Vejle, Give, Esbjerg, Skanderborg and Aarhus – and of course to Billund itself, which is only a few kilometres away.

Onward travel is even easier between June and August, when a free shuttle bus runs regularly between the airport, the city centre and Billund’s main attractions. LEGOLAND is also served by route 384, which leaves the airport every hour on the hour and stops at the LEGOLAND Holiday Village and Hotel LEGOLAND, before continuing to the city centre.

Outside of peak season, many visitors opt to hire a car, and there are a number of international agencies stationed at the airport, including Avis, Budget, Hertz, Europcar, and Sixt. Taxis are also readily available outside the terminal building, but this is Denmark, so be prepared for high prices.

Events

Throughout the wider Jutland region, you’ll find a number of festivals and events taking place throughout the year.

Every July, huge crowds descend on Vorbasse, 10 miles south of Billund, for Denmark’s largest market. First held in 1730, it was traditionally dominated by horse trading, and around 500 horses still change hands at the market each year. But today horse traders are joined hundreds of other dealers selling anything you can think of. You’ll also find food and drink stalls on site as well as live music and amusement rides. The dates vary, so keep an eye on the market's website to see when the market is taking place this year.

August brings Triangle Festival Week, a series of cultural festivals that take place around Vejle, Fredericia and Kolding in east Jutland. The main focus is on visual arts, music and literature, but there are also events shining a light on the region's history and natural environment. There's usually loads going on for children too, so it's worth factoring the festival in if you're taking the family on a late summer trip to LEGOLAND.

The Kolding Light Festival (December) was Denmark's first light festival, and is still the country's biggest. It brings hundreds of installations, videos and light shows to the city's streets – and since Kolding's streets are picturesque in the first place, the effect is pretty magical. The festival ends with a spectacular firework display.

For wine fans, September is the month to come. That's when the annual Ribe Wine Festival brings exhibitors from all over the world to the city's streets – it's a chance to meet a wide range of wine producers, hear their stories and (most importantly) taste their wares. Ribe is also home to the International Viking Market (May), which sees hundreds of volunteers recreate an authentic Viking market day in the town centre.