WW2 ordnance discovery at London City Airport

A chronological list of statements are below, in relation to the discovery of an unexploded WW2 ordnance in...

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Andrew Scott

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Liam McKay

Director of Corporate Affairs

12/02/2018

...King George V Dock, south of airport.

The airport is now open.

Tuesday 13 February at 00:00

London City Airport will be open as normal on Tuesday, following the safe removal of a World War Two ordnance from the dock.

Robert Sinclair, CEO of London City Airport said: “The World War Two ordnance discovered in King George V Dock has been safely removed by the Royal Navy and Met Police. As a result, the exclusion zone has now been lifted and the airport will be open as normal on Tuesday. I would like to thank the Navy, Police and the London Borough of Newham for their professionalism and expertise in bringing this incident to a safe conclusion. Finally, to everyone who has been affected - whether you were due to fly on Monday, were evacuated from your home or had your commute to work disrupted by the DLR closure – thank you for your patience and understanding.”

A video statement from Robert Sinclair, Chief Executive of London City Airport is available here:

Monday 12 February at 16:00

Robert Sinclair, CEO of London City Airport said:

“The airport will remain closed for the rest of the day, following the discovery of a World War Two ordnance in King George V Dock on Sunday. An exclusion zone is in place in the immediate area.

“Any passengers due to fly today are urged not to come to the airport and to contact their airline for further information. I’m pleased to say some airlines were able to secure space at alternative airports so that some flights can operate – CityJet at Southend and Alitalia at Stansted. Thanks to those airports for stepping in to help out.

“I recognise this has caused inconvenience for our passengers, and in particular some of our local residents. The airport is cooperating fully with the Met Police, Royal Navy and London Borough of Newham to safely remove the device and resolve the situation as quickly as possible. The operation is proceeding well and we anticipate it to be completed during the course of this evening. At this stage we fully expect that the airport will be open as normal tomorrow."

Passengers due to travel on Tuesday are asked not to arrive more than two hours before their flight.

Monday 12 February at 13:00

A video statement from Robert Sinclair, Chief Executive of London City Airport is available here:

Monday 12 February at 07:30

Robert Sinclair, CEO of London City Airport said: “The airport remains closed this morning following the discovery of a World War Two ordnance in King George V Dock on Sunday. All flights in and out of London City on Monday are cancelled and an exclusion zone is in place in the immediate area.

“I urge any passengers due to fly today not to come to the airport and to contact their airline for further information.

“I recognise this is causing inconvenience for our passengers, and in particular some of our local residents. The airport is cooperating fully with the Met Police and Royal Navy and working hard to safely remove the device and resolve the situation as quickly as possible.”

Sunday 11 February at 23:30

A spokesperson for London City Airport said:

"Following the discovery of a World War Two ordnance in King George V Dock as part of planned development works, a 214m exclusion zone has been implemented as a precaution by the Met Police. As a result, London City Airport is currently closed.

“All passengers due to travel from London City on Monday are advised to contact their airline for further information. Passengers are advised not to travel to the airport until further notice.

“The airport is cooperating fully with the Met Police, Royal Navy and London Borough of Newham."